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Keep it clean – keep it safe

Keep it clean – keep it safe

2012-04-19_1Clean: Wash Hands and Surfaces Often
Bacteria can be spread throughout the kitchen and get onto hands, cutting boards, utensils, counter tops, and food.

Wash your hands with warm water and soap for at least 20 seconds before and after handling food and after using the bathroom or changing diapers.

Wash your hands after playing with pets or visiting petting zoos.

Wash your cutting boards, dishes, utensils, and counter tops with hot soapy water after preparing each food item and before you go on to the next food.

Consider using paper towels to clean up kitchen surfaces. If you use cloth towels wash them often in the hot cycle of your washing machine.

Rinse fresh fruits and vegetables under running tap water, including those with skins and rinds that are not eaten.

Rub firm-skinned fruits and vegetables under running tap water or scrub with a clean vegetable brush while rinsing with running tap water.

Keep books, backpacks, or shopping bags off the kitchen table or counters where food is prepared or served.

Separate: Don't Cross Contaminate
Cross-contamination is how bacteria can be spread. When handling raw meat, poultry, seafood, and eggs, keep these foods and their juices away from ready-to-eat foods. Always start with a clean scene ― wash hands with warm water and soap. Wash cutting boards, dishes, countertops, and utensils with hot soapy water.

Separate raw meat, poultry, seafood, and eggs from other foods in your grocery shopping cart, grocery bags, and in your refrigerator.

Use one cutting board for fresh produce and a separate one for raw meat, poultry, and seafood.

Use a food thermometer, which measures the internal temperature of cooked meat, poultry, and egg dishes, to make sure that the food is cooked to a safe internal temperature.

Never place cooked food on a plate that previously held raw meat, poultry, seafood, or eggs.

For more information, visit the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS).

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